Crowns:

A crown is a laboratory-formed restoration that completely covers the tooth. They are normally constructed in porcelain or in some cases gold for back teeth.

Crowns are used to rebuild a broken or badly decayed tooth, to strengthen teeth or to improve the cosmetic appearance of a tooth.

This is normally a 2-stage procedure involving preparation of the tooth followed by impressions and placement of a temporary crown. On receipt of the crown from the laboratory, it is cemented into place at the second visit.

Veneers:

A veneer is a thin ‘facing’ normally in porcelain that is cemented onto the front of the tooth. The veneer is constructed in the laboratory. Veneers are commonly used to cover any imperfections/discolouration of the tooth surface. Very little of the tooth surface is removed at preparation stage yet can greatly enhance the appearance of the tooth.

Minor twist of overlapping can be corrected using veneer.

Bridges:

A bridge is a fixed restoration used to replace a missing tooth or teeth. A fixed bridge is made by placing crowns on the teeth on either side of the space bonded to which the false component is placed. The supporting teeth may often have large restorations present and will be strengthened by the addition of a crown.

An adhesive bridge has metal wings bonded to the back of the supporting teeth thus avoiding removing too much tooth tissue on these teeth, These are particularly useful where the supporting teeth have not already been filled.

Bridges are often recommended where there is insufficient bone for provision of an implant-retained restoration.

Provision of a bridge is also a 2-visit procedure.